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I believe whether it’s a back door or a front door that the American principle of law should still hold that our federal government should have to get a warrant, whether they want to come through the back door or your front door. And I also agree, Lester, with Benjamin Franklin, who said, no people should ever give up their privacy or their freedoms in a promise for security. So we’re a collaborative people. We need collaborative leadership here with Silicon Valley and other bright people in my own state of Maryland and around the NSA that can actually figure this out. But there are certain immutable principles that will not become antique things in our country so long as we defend our country and its values and its freedoms. And one of those things is our right to be secure in our homes, and our right to expect that our federal government should have to get a warrant. I also want to the say that while we’ve made some progress on the Patriot Act, I do believe that we need an adversarial court system there. We need a public advocate. We need to develop jurisprudence so that we can develop a body of law that protects the privacy of Americans in the information and digital age.
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Question/Notes/Context: 
BROWNLEE: Tech companies are responsible for the encryption technology to protect personal data, but the government wants a back door into that information. So do you think it’s possible to find common ground? And where do you stand on privacy versus security?
Source Title: 
Transcript of the Democratic Presidential Debate
Source Publisher Name: 
New York Times
Source Publication Date: 
Sunday, January 17, 2016